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30-Year Fixed-Rate Mortgage Matches All-Time Record Low

December 19, 2011

30-Year Fixed-Rate Mortgage Matches All-Time Record Low

RISMEDIA, Monday, December 19, 2011— Freddie Mac recently released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing average fixed mortgage rates at or near their all-time lows. The 30-year fixed matched the average all-time record low of 3.94 percent, and a new all-time record low was set for the 15-year fixed, both previously set in the October 6, 2011 Freddie Mac PMMS. The five-year ARM also set a new all-time record low at 2.86 percent for the week.

30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 3.94 percent with an average 0.8 point for the week ending December 15, 2011, down from the previous week when it averaged 3.99 percent. Last year at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 4.83 percent.

15-year FRM this week averaged 3.21 percent with an average 0.8 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.27 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 4.17 percent.

Five-year, Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.86 percent this week, with an average 0.6 point, down from last week when it averaged 2.93 percent. A year ago, the five-year ARM averaged 3.77 percent.

One-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.81 percent this week with an average 0.6 point, up from last week when it averaged 2.80 percent. At this time last year, the one-year ARM averaged 3.35 percent.

Average commitment rates should be reported along with average fees and points to reflect the total upfront cost of obtaining the mortgage. Visit the following links for Regional and National Mortgage Rate Details and Definitions. Borrowers may still pay closing costs which are not included in the survey.

“Mortgage rates were at or near all-time record lows this week amid a rough environment for housing. In its December 13th monetary policy announcement, the Federal Reserve reiterated the housing market remains depressed. Over the first nine months of 2012, households lost almost $400 billion in property values which contributed to a $1.4 trillion reduction in overall net worth,” said Frank Nothaft, vice president and chief economist, Freddie Mac.

“In addition, serious delinquency rates (90 or more days delinquent plus foreclosures) on mortgages increased slightly between June 30 and September 30 of the year, breaking a six-quarter consecutive decline, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association.”

For more information, visit http://www.freddiemac.com.

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